New paper using data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

Meredith Van Natta, a PhD candidate at the University of California San Francisco, and Dr. Zimmer recently published a paper, "What’s in a word? Language and self-assessed health in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." They used data from the NHANES to examine the extent to which the Spanish language influences the way in … Continue reading New paper using data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

Presentation at REVES 2019

Dr. Zimmer presented the paper "Socio-economic Correlates of Life Expected in Degrees of Frailty" at the 2019 REVES Conference held in Barcelona, Spain from May 29-31, 2019 at UPF Barcelona. The objective of this paper is to examine transitions in frailty and compute life expected across degrees of frailty by socio-demographic characteristics commonly found to … Continue reading Presentation at REVES 2019

New article published in the Journal of Aging and Health

April 25, 2019 Dr. Zimmer and the Linking Spirituality and Religiosity to Life and Health Expectancy team published a new article - Religiosity Dimensions and Disability-Free Life Expectancy in Taiwan. Figure 2. Net gain or loss in TLE, DFLE, and DLE years at age 70, comparing the highest and lowest levels of religiosity, and 95% confidence … Continue reading New article published in the Journal of Aging and Health

Spring 2019 – Conference Presentations

In April 2019, Dr. Zimmer traveled to Austin, TX for the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America. He presented the poster, "The Rise and Prominence of Skip-Generation Households in Low- and Middle-Income Countries."  In May 2019, he will present the paper entitled, "Socio-Demographic Correlates of Life Expected in Degrees of Frailty" at the … Continue reading Spring 2019 – Conference Presentations

New article using data from Taiwan on religious activity and mortality

The Linking Spirituality and Religiosity to Life and Health Expectancy team published an article that examines the extent to which religious activity distinguishes the mortality experiences of older adults living in Taiwan.  Check out the article here:  Does Religious Activity Distinguish the Mortality Experiences of Older Taiwanese? An Analysis Using Eighteen Years of Follow-Up Data